Daylight saving time set to begin again this weekend

Western Australia, the Northern Territory and Queensland don't adhere to daylight saving time. Photo: Supplied
Western Australia, the Northern Territory and Queensland don't adhere to daylight saving time. Photo: Supplied

NAMBUCCA VALLEY residents will need to put their clocks forward by one hour this Sunday at 2 am for the start of daylight saving time.

The majority of smart devices and computers will automatically adjust the time; however, older clocks and watches need to be changed manually.

Daylight saving will last until April 4, 2021, when clocks will have to be turned back by one hour.

Joining NSW in turning their clocks forward will be Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and the ACT, while Western Australia, the Northern Territory and Queensland prefer to avoid the practice.

The exact date of daylight saving differs every year, but traditionally it begins on the first Sunday of October, and ends the first Sunday of April.

A recent ResMed Sleep Health Survey shows one-in-four Australians are already not getting enough sleep, and almost half of adults have trouble sleeping three or more nights a week.

"The spring forward can actually present significant sleep health issues for some of us," ResMed's Dr Carmel Harrington said.

"We may gain another hour of daylight, but our body clock is not so quick in its adjustment, and we will find it harder to go to sleep that hour earlier and find it difficult to wake up that hour earlier."

Dr Harrington suggests adjusting your body by waking and going to bed earlier on Saturday to make up for the lost time overnight and to make bedrooms as bright as possible to help wake up.

Daylight Saving History

New Zealand Entomologist George Hudson is credited with inventing the modern concept of daylight saving time after heproposed a two-hour time shift, so he'd have more hours of sunshine to work.

Canada was among the first countries to adopt the concept in 1908 as a way to make better use of daylight.

Germany and Austria followed suit in 1916 as a way of reducing fuel usage in WWI.

The concept has since caught on globally, with over 70 countries adopting the practice.

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