Witness held woman as she died after crash

Patrick Nealon has pleaded not guilty to aggravated dangerous driving occasioning death.
Patrick Nealon has pleaded not guilty to aggravated dangerous driving occasioning death.

A man has described the "life-changing" moment a young woman died in his arms after she was hit by an allegedly drunk and speeding driver in Sydney's south.

Niloy Saha told jurors he felt 22-year-old Nicole Lewanski take her final breath as he cradled her following the accident at Wolli Creek in December 2016.

Patrick Nealon, 38, has pleaded not guilty to aggravated dangerous driving occasioning death in the Downing Centre District Court.

The prosecution alleges Nealon was drunk after spending several hours at the pub when he lost control of his V8 ute while speeding on the Princes Highway.

Mr Saha was in his car waiting at traffic lights when he saw Nealon's car attempt to make a sudden right turn across three lanes of traffic, fishtail, mount a pedestrian island before knocking Ms Lewanski several metres into the air, the court heard on Thursday.

He said that after a fellow bystander administered CPR, he held the young woman.

"I was just holding her, she took her last breath in my arms," Mr Saha said.

"You just know, when someone's body weight shifts. Sitting in my arms, I felt her last breath."

Members of Ms Lewanski's family sitting in the back of the court struggled to contain their emotions during Mr Saha's testimony.

Mr Saha told the court the incident had shaken him. It was "very life-changing" and led him to ask: "What's the point?"

He said that after Nealon got out of his car, he looked intoxicated and as if he'd had "more than a few drinks".

Fellow witness Paul Harrison told the court he was in the car park of a neighbouring supermarket when he heard the accident.

Mr Harrison performed CPR on Ms Lewanski but was unable to revive her.

He said after ambulance officers arrived he noticed the ute's driver had disappeared.

Nealon was subsequently found among trees in the supermarket car park in an incoherent state.

Mr Harrison said Nealon failed to respond to basic directions from a police officer and appeared drunk.

"(He was) very intoxicated and very incoherent," he told the court.

When asked by Nealon's barrister, Nicholas Baltinos, whether his client's state could be attributed to shock, Mr Harrison replied: "I don't agree with that."

Witness Keagan Legrange was sitting in traffic waiting to turn into Brodie Sparks Drive when he saw Nealon's ute speed past and fishtail.

He said Nealon's ute had not been clipped or hit by another vehicle.

Prosecutor Christopher Taylor asked: "Can you say that with certainty?"

"Yes," Mr Legrange replied.

The trial continues.

Australian Associated Press