Nambucca responds to same-sex marriage survey results

The results to the federal survey that cost Australia $122 million came in yesterday with a majority of Australians returning a ‘yes’ response.

The same-sex marriage survey results showed that the ‘yes’ vote won by 61.6 percent (7,817,247 people) while the ‘no’ vote accounted for 38.4 percent (4,873,987).

Cowper was pretty well in line with the nation, but erring on the side of conservatism with 60 percent of respondents voting ‘yes’ (57,493) versus the ‘no’ vote at 40 percent (38,317).

The participation rate in Cowper (79 percent) was also in line with the nation at 79.5 percent.

Guardian News pounded the pavement today to find out what the Valley thinks about the result.

Brian Fuller, past president of the Macksville Probus Club

Brian Fuller, past president of the Macksville Probus Club

Brian Fuller

“My wife and I both voted yes,” Brian said.

“Our opinion is, if that’s what people want to do then they should be welcome to do it.

“I had a feeling that it was going to be an overwhelming ‘yes’ vote yesterday—everyone that I know voted ‘yes’.

“I also believe that anyone who has strong beliefs shouldn’t be made to bake a cake etc.—it’s all about personal choice.”

Natalie Frecklington

Natalie Frecklington

Natalie Frecklington

“I have lesbian friends so I was pretty happy when I found out,” Natalie said.

“Now if my friends get married I can go to their wedding.

“But I don’t even think there should have been a vote. It should have just been legalised anyway.”

Kerry Gibson

Kerry Gibson

Kerry Gibson

“You probably don’t want to talk to me, love, I’m dead-set against it all,” Kerry said.

“I don’t feel that it’s right, it’s definitely not, it goes against God in my books.

“I heard it a bit on the radio yesterday that they got away with it and I was disappointed, I suppose.

“I hope the politicians turn it down.

“If I was up top I’d get rid of it, but I suppose it’s not up to me.”

Dylan Kelly

Dylan Kelly

Dylan Kelly

“I would have voted yes, but I didn’t get around to it,” Dylan said.

“But there shouldn’t have been a vote—love is love.

“It shouldn’t be illegal for a man to love a man and a lady to love a lady.

“There are so many judgmental people around this area that it would be pretty hard to be gay.”

Simon Matheson

Simon Matheson

Simon Matheson

“I have quite a few gay friends and we’ve talked about it, but they never push their agenda on anyone,” Simon said.

“It’s great for them, they have every right to be happy.

“As I said jokingly to one of my friends—‘if you want to be miserable in marriage like the rest of us, then go for it’.

“I wasn’t too surprised at the result, everyone I know voted yes.”

Florence Stephenson, Vice President of Macksville Probus Club

Florence Stephenson, Vice President of Macksville Probus Club

Florence Stephenson

“I personally respect that every individual has a choice,” Florence said.

“I wouldn’t deem to pass judgement and I accept people for who they are.

“I’m 86 years old and I grew up in a traditional Christian family.

“I suppose for the couples involved it was important that it went to parliament, but I wish it hadn’t needed to go that far.

“I was a little surprised at the result, but then the yes side has been growing in momentum.

“I think five years ago the vote might have been different.

“But I had an aunt by marriage in the dim, dark ages who had a female partner, and the only person who condemned it was one of her sisters.”

Billy Barrett

Billy Barrett

Billy Barrett

“It was good for the people who follow and support it, I guess, because now they have fairness and equality,” Billy said.

“I wasn’t really following it too much, but I voted yes.

“Considering the amount of gay people we have in this country, the result didn’t really surprise me.”